found in a corner of the university...

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“Methods always—and of necessity—have conditions, not only because of their objects but even more because of the postulates on which they are ultimately based.”

—Sigurd Burckhardt

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abstemiast:

   In the summer of 1937 he felt a renewal of the old passion for study and learning; and with the curious and disembodied vigor of the scholar that is the condition of neither youth nor age, he returned to the only life that had not betrayed him. He discovered that he had not gone far from that life even in his despair.

—John Williams.

It’s Stoner!

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Du Bois on the University

"The function of the university is not simply to teach bread-winning, or to furnish teachers for the public schools or to be a centre of polite society; it is, above all, to be the organ of that fine adjustment between real life and the growing knowledge of life, an adjustment which forms the secret of civilization."

—W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

Filed under Du Bois University

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"The main attack against the intellectual heritage of the past was in fact on a narrower front. It was directed primarily against what the writers of the 1890’s chose to call ‘positivism’. By this they did not mean simply the rather quaint doctrines associated with Auguste Comte, who had originally coined the term. Nor did they mean the social philosophy of Herbert Spencer, which was the guise in which positivist thinking was most apparent in their own time. They used the word in a looser sense to characterize the whole tendency to discuss human behavior in terms of analogies drawn from natural science. In reacting against it, the innovators of the 1890’s felt that they were rejecting the most pervasive intellectual tenet of their time. They believed that they were casting off a spiritual yoke that the preceding quarter-century had laid upon them."

—H. Stuart Hughes, Consciousness and Society

 

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"The question of whether or not the abolition of the human is a good or a bad idea is not to be decided by a show of hands."

Richard Poirier

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"I heard people talking at the ferry landing. I heard what they said, too—every word of it.  One man said it was getting towards the long days and the short nights now.  T’other one said THIS warn’t one of the short ones, he reckoned—and then they laughed, and he said it over again, and they laughed again; then they waked up another fellow and told him, and laughed, but he didn’t laugh; he ripped out something brisk, and said let him alone.  The first fellow said he ‘lowed to tell it to his old woman—she would think it was pretty good; but he said that warn’t nothing to some things he had said in his time. I heard one man say it was nearly three o’clock, and he hoped daylight wouldn’t wait more than about a week longer.  After that the talk got further and further away, and I couldn’t make out the words any more; but I could hear the mumble, and now and then a laugh, too, but it seemed a long ways off.”

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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When we are learning to walk, to ride, to swim, skate, fence, write, play, or sing, we interrupt ourselves at every step by unnecessary movements and false notes. When we are proficients, on the contrary, the results not only follow with the very minimum of muscular action requisite to bring them forth, they also follow from a single instantaneous ‘cue.’”

William James, “Habit”

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"The chief and primary cause of this development and very rapid increase of nervousness is modern civilization, which is distinguished from the ancient by these five characteristics: steampower, the periodical press, the telegraph,the sciences, and the mental activity of women."

—George M. Beard, American Nervousness (1881)

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"The chief and primary cause of this development and very rapid increase of nervousness ismodern civilization, which is distinguished from the ancient by these five characteristics: steampower, the periodical press, the telegraph,the sciences, and the mental activity of women."

—George M. Beard, American Nervousness (1881)

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"That cheap originality which finds expression in putting things to uses for which they were not intended is often confused with individuality; whereas the latter consists not in an attempt to be different from other people at the cost of comfort, but in the desire to be comfortable in one’s own way, even thought it be the way of a monotonously large majority." 

—Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman, Jr.The Decoration of Houses